Artists > Lauren Lipinski Eisen

Firelight
Encaustic, metal, paper, grasses, and clematis pod on wood
14" x 14"
$800
Crown Fire
Encaustic, paper, and smokebush on wood panel
14" x 14"
$800
Plume Rise
Encaustic, paper, and smokebush on wood panel
14" x 14"
$800
Containment
Encaustic, paper, grasses, and smokebush on wood
14" x 14"
$800
Hybridization/ Reversion
Encaustic, metal, paper,grass, and clematis pods on wood panel
25" x 25"
$1600
Regeneration
Encaustic, paper, metal, heliotrope and clematis pods on wood panel
25" x 25"
$1600
Ring of Fire
Encaustic, paper, oregano, smokebush, on wood panel
12" x 24"
$1600

Artist Statement

My mixed-media paintings investigate the visual portrayal of merging separate moments in time into single images. Unified views are divided into translucent sections through the use of differentiated colors and materials, representing stages of visual phenomenon and time sequences.

In the Wildfire series, these divisions represent time paradoxes present in the stages of an ongoing wildfire event, where a large wildfire can jump from treetop to treetop in seconds, continue to consume and burn for weeks or months, the destruction ultimately succeeded by regrowth. The Tinkers Creek series investigates the concept of simultaneity through the telescopic layering of images depicting different time periods of one place. The images are nestled as a series of gradually fading memories, from recent moments of clarity to more ambiguous, darkened, forgotten images. This reflection of time portrays the largest ripples of long ago fading into the darkness while the urgency of the newly formed memories remains clearest.

In addition to this focus on memory and place, my images explore the relationships between landscape, architecture, agriculture, horticulture and other aspects of industry that affect native plant and animal life. References to these subjects are integrated into the surface of the paintings as dimensional collage elements. Branches, reeds, seeds and other raw plant materials as well as processed food items and animal effigies are embedded into the medium to showcase their fragile nature in various stages of life, from embryos to post-harvest products processed for mass consumption. Copper, metal wire, and mesh underlying and surrounding the paintings suggest a mechanical / industrial presence infiltrating and isolating the natural ecosystem. This ongoing series of mixed media works comments on our consumption of natural resources, utilizing produce and patterns of planting to reference agricultural and genetic modification of the landscape and alludes to a variety of interactions between man-made structures and the natural environment: inspiration and imitation, digestion and destruction, cultivation and captivity.